For Us

By Tolulope Obasuyi

That broke Cara. Bringing Tommy up was like poking an open wound with a needle. She stood up and went to the bathroom, silently staring at her face in the mirror. After some minutes, Cara heard the sound of footsteps and the door closing. So she went back into the room, hugged her pillow and thought of the first man she had loved.

War Survivors

by Omobolaji Ibadi’aran Omotade

At the height of the “First Gulf War” or “Holy Defence”, a young boy of twelve years who had been recruited to carry a bomb to be detonated at the Jahan square, ran away. The horror he felt he would see at the beautiful busy square, full of innocent people going about their day’s work to provide for their daily needs burnt to ashes, motivated his action.

Kachi Ude

by Kathryn Olushola

That was the bombshell. It was so loud and heavy that you cried because it left brunt wounds and bruises on your skin. You were confused. Surely you didn’t feel the same way because you liked 500-Level a lot. You begged him not to do it, not to stop talking to you that you both could work this out, that you could even fall in love with him back, but he went offline and didn’t say anything else.

Kiss on an Empty Street

by Adeola Juwon

He has released her now; he’s holding her on her shoulder, looking into her face while his mouth says words I can’t hear. I wish the air can carry his words to me – the words that make Ola’s face flush red, her shoulders vibrating as she giggles.

Storytellers

by Ngozi Janet Akalonu

Forever was just a thought, a fleeting wisp of entanglement strong enough to hold the moment, but too weak to last the time.
I saw it in his eyes, millions of stars, stars that held promises, promises that dissolved with the dawn of every new day.

Memories

by Dexter Joseph

Taking a sit, hands up my face and tears storming into them, I cry for lots of reasons. The deceit we’d just experienced, the sincerity in both our hearts for it, the honesty in my suggestion for all this, the hope I had, that I’d also instilled in him. The blame I got for trying to do something which would have helped him, and our home, had it not been a fraud. I cry, cursing underneath by breath those who’d done this to me, to us.

The Priesthood Affair (1-3)

by Tiana Akachi Ifenkwe

He had come to pick her just a few miles away from her house. She got into his car and greeted. He replied with a smile, that smile that always melted her. The smile she’d been drawn to in the first place. Oh God, she muttered. This wasn’t going to be an easy feat. What was she even thinking when she accepted the date?

You cannot copy content of this page